Brave Teachers, Brave Kids

As part of our Open House presentation, my 4th graders and I had to talk about our SMART goals.  Knowing how I have failed miserably with the T in SMART (timely, including an end date) and maybe even the S and the M (specific and measurable), I planned on this going something like this:

Me: Let’s talk about the goals we have set this year!

Kids: [flipping way back in their journals to the beginning of the year]……(crickets)……ummmmm….

But THIS is how it went instead:

Me: Let’s talk about the goals we have set this year! (pause)

Kid 1: I really wanted to speak out more in class….(1st one to speak!)

Kid 2: I wanted to be brave enough to try the spelling bee. (Made it to the 3rd round!)

Kid 3: I have been working hard to start math problems every time, not wait for the answer. (A leader in math who now helps others when they are stuck!)

Kid 4:  At the beginning of the year, I was scared to speak Spanish, I had a goal to practice more.  (HUGE improvement with second language!)

And it went on and on for at least 10 minutes, my students sharing their goals, amazing me with their thoughts.  And as I listened, I realized I knew what they had been working on because I saw the evidence and the results even though we had never even discussed them!  It was magical!  How did they learn all of this?  Why did they care to make goals and try for something bigger?  I sure hadn’t been their teacher on this part…

Then I realized a trend, most of the goals had to do with taking risks.   My quiet girls wanted to speak up.  The shyest girl in the class, she was the spelling bee representative from our class.  My mathematicians, discouraged from state testing (ugh…) and the new challenges of 4th grade wanted to practice, to learn, to GO FOR IT!  Where did this even come from?  I had an odd theory…maybe from my summer promise to make this “My Year of Living Dangerously”.

I shared this idea with my kids at the beginning of the year, and anytime that I took a risk, I told them.  These exchanges happened in side conversations, in my writing examples, in the technology that we were beginning to use.   Some of my risks were small, like staying up late on a school night (gasp!).   Some of my risks have been big, like transitioning to online homework, and finally posting this blog.   I took my kids along as we tried Google Sites and recently with Genius Hour (just a month before state testing!  Yipes!).  Why?  Well…why not?

That “Why not?” attitude is clear in the goals they set and have achieved.  Why not be the first to speak?  Why not try something that is REALLY hard?  Why not try something big for my Genius Hour project?  Why not!?!

I’ve always believed that I can’t ask the kids to do something I am not going to do, can’t, or won’t do.   Here I saw what happened when that took place on a whole different level within the walls of my classroom.   The climate has always depended on my actions with my kids, but seeing them own their bold, risk-taking goals was way more that I ever thought possible.  And as my kids continue to take these risks, I take them too, inspired by their curiosity, kindness, creativity, and bravery.

So…let’s risk looking silly in front of our peers for the sake of our learning and the betterment of our kids!  Let’s not let the fear of mistakes keep us from trying something new or scary!  Let’s be bold learners and adventurous teachers!  Why not?  You never know who might be following you!

(P.S. If you are good at helping 4th and 5th graders set SMART goals, just let me know!  I am not afraid to ask for help!)

Advertisements