Hoping in 2015

The year begins today…PD in action with lots of happy faces, hugs, and so much thinking that I think I need another summer break 🙂 Then our beautiful principal gives the question and 10 minutes to reflect: what hopes we have for our kids in 2015-2016?  We have all been thinking all summer about plans and analyzing data, but our hopes we have for them? Wow, that is one of my favorite words like EVER. That’s something I can really get excited about…

So what do I hope?

I hope they are as ready as I am.

I hope they are brave when I am not.

I hope they push me to learn more.

I hope they listen to each other.

I hope they feel loved.

I hope they catch my enthusiasm for learning.

I hope they have fun.

I hope they laugh a lot.

I hope they are kind.

I hope they look back at this year and remember that I made them feel like a million bucks.

Honestly, I can’t say much more than this…my hopes for myself are summed up above.  If I can do all of this for a student, I am doing all I need to do as an educator!

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Surrounded by Smarties (but not the candy)

I spent the last few days in AWE of my colleagues. I have always known I was working with some very intelligent people, but to be back with them sharing what they know after they have spent their summers preparing, I just have to say I am beyond impressed. And I was reflecting a little, NOT during class, of course!
Last month we met as a leadership team to discuss our problem of practice and goals for the new school year. Our focus centered around “connected impact”. Our forward thinking Assistant Superintendent had some really good illustrations to prove the point–we really don’t need a new book, binder, or program…what we need to solve any problem, issue, or conflict is the connections we have. There is SO much experience, intelligence, and knowledge just down the hall, across the district, or in our PLNs.
“Connected” teachers know this. We reach out and ask for what we need. We share what we have without that old fear that someone probably already knows…right? But what are we doing to reach those who are not connected? Do they know they have something to lend to the community? Do they understand how much they are needed? As teacher leaders it is important that we encourage each other, “spur each other on” with this idea.

My humble friends who believe they have nothing to teach another, watch the video I show to my students each year, “Obvious to You, Amazing to Others”.  Such a perfect way to say it…you have knowledge someone needs.

Everyone has something to share and lend to the conversation. We are surrounded by smarties! It is our job to encourage others to see their influence and get connected to make an impact with other educators maybe they never knew they even had.

I am proud of my friends who presented this summer, and I can’t wait to see the influence we will all have as purposefully and personally connected educators.

Brave Teachers, Brave Kids

As part of our Open House presentation, my 4th graders and I had to talk about our SMART goals.  Knowing how I have failed miserably with the T in SMART (timely, including an end date) and maybe even the S and the M (specific and measurable), I planned on this going something like this:

Me: Let’s talk about the goals we have set this year!

Kids: [flipping way back in their journals to the beginning of the year]……(crickets)……ummmmm….

But THIS is how it went instead:

Me: Let’s talk about the goals we have set this year! (pause)

Kid 1: I really wanted to speak out more in class….(1st one to speak!)

Kid 2: I wanted to be brave enough to try the spelling bee. (Made it to the 3rd round!)

Kid 3: I have been working hard to start math problems every time, not wait for the answer. (A leader in math who now helps others when they are stuck!)

Kid 4:  At the beginning of the year, I was scared to speak Spanish, I had a goal to practice more.  (HUGE improvement with second language!)

And it went on and on for at least 10 minutes, my students sharing their goals, amazing me with their thoughts.  And as I listened, I realized I knew what they had been working on because I saw the evidence and the results even though we had never even discussed them!  It was magical!  How did they learn all of this?  Why did they care to make goals and try for something bigger?  I sure hadn’t been their teacher on this part…

Then I realized a trend, most of the goals had to do with taking risks.   My quiet girls wanted to speak up.  The shyest girl in the class, she was the spelling bee representative from our class.  My mathematicians, discouraged from state testing (ugh…) and the new challenges of 4th grade wanted to practice, to learn, to GO FOR IT!  Where did this even come from?  I had an odd theory…maybe from my summer promise to make this “My Year of Living Dangerously”.

I shared this idea with my kids at the beginning of the year, and anytime that I took a risk, I told them.  These exchanges happened in side conversations, in my writing examples, in the technology that we were beginning to use.   Some of my risks were small, like staying up late on a school night (gasp!).   Some of my risks have been big, like transitioning to online homework, and finally posting this blog.   I took my kids along as we tried Google Sites and recently with Genius Hour (just a month before state testing!  Yipes!).  Why?  Well…why not?

That “Why not?” attitude is clear in the goals they set and have achieved.  Why not be the first to speak?  Why not try something that is REALLY hard?  Why not try something big for my Genius Hour project?  Why not!?!

I’ve always believed that I can’t ask the kids to do something I am not going to do, can’t, or won’t do.   Here I saw what happened when that took place on a whole different level within the walls of my classroom.   The climate has always depended on my actions with my kids, but seeing them own their bold, risk-taking goals was way more that I ever thought possible.  And as my kids continue to take these risks, I take them too, inspired by their curiosity, kindness, creativity, and bravery.

So…let’s risk looking silly in front of our peers for the sake of our learning and the betterment of our kids!  Let’s not let the fear of mistakes keep us from trying something new or scary!  Let’s be bold learners and adventurous teachers!  Why not?  You never know who might be following you!

(P.S. If you are good at helping 4th and 5th graders set SMART goals, just let me know!  I am not afraid to ask for help!)